CARY WOLFE WHAT IS POSTHUMANISM PDF

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — What Is Posthumanism? What Is Posthumanism? What does it mean to think beyond humanism? Is it possible to craft a mode of philosophy, ethics, and interpretation that rejects the classic humanist divisions of self and other, mind and body, society and nature, human and animal, organic and technological?

Can a new kind of humanities-posthumanities-respond to the redefinition of humanity's place in the world by both th What does it mean to think beyond humanism? Can a new kind of humanities-posthumanities-respond to the redefinition of humanity's place in the world by both the technological and the biological or "green" continuum in which the "human" is but one life form among many?

Exploring how both critical thought along with cultural practice have reacted to this radical repositioning, Cary Wolfe-one of the founding figures in the field of animal studies and posthumanist theory-ranges across bioethics, cognitive science, animal ethics, gender, and disability to develop a theoretical and philosophical approach responsive to our changing understanding of ourselves and our world.

For Wolfe, a vibrant, rigorous posthumanism is vital for addressing questions of ethics and justice, language and trans-species communication, social systems and their inclusions and exclusions, and the intellectual aspirations of interdisciplinarity. In What Is Posthumanism? In doing so, Wolfe reveals that it is humanism, not the human in all its embodied and prosthetic complexity, that is left behind in posthumanist thought.

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Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of What Is Posthumanism? Apr 19, Karl Steel rated it liked it Shelves: animals , theory. If you've been reading Wolfe, you've already read this. Comprising articles on Bjork and psychoanalytic theory, systems theory, critical animal theory, Wallace Stevens, and Emerson, What is Posthumanism never quite gelled into a book for me. Instead of this collection, I would have welcomed an entire, brief book collecting the critical animal theory material Wolfe has published since Animal Rites and a separate, somewhat longer book on systems theory.

The imagined systems theory book would have If you've been reading Wolfe, you've already read this. The imagined systems theory book would have had a more sustained and careful treatment of N.

Katherine Hayles, surely, as I understand things, the big name in systems theory and cultural studies. On her, in the book as actually published, Wolfe writes: my sense of posthumanism does not partake of the fantasy of the posthuman described by N. Katherine Hayles, which imagines a triumphant transcendence of embodiment and 'privileges informational pattern over material instantiation, so that embodiment in a biological substrate is seen as an accident of history rather than an inevitability of life.

I'm surprised that anyone who's read How We Became Posthuman could believe Hayles promotes a transcendent model of transhumanism but some do!

Perhaps a quibble? At any rate, the book is more than worth the price of entrance for its chart on Cary Wolfe is brilliant, and the themes he presents here are dear to my own heart, but I can't say I enjoyed this at all.

I think I also still resent him for prompting me to watch Dancer in the Dark , which I thought was offensively dreadful, but which he seemed to find wonderful. Actually, the book and film have some things in common that way: both are smart, but require a lot of work on the part of the audience, which may not ultimately feel worth it; the bits of brilliance are densely hidde Cary Wolfe is brilliant, and the themes he presents here are dear to my own heart, but I can't say I enjoyed this at all.

Actually, the book and film have some things in common that way: both are smart, but require a lot of work on the part of the audience, which may not ultimately feel worth it; the bits of brilliance are densely hidden in Dancer , this felt willfully obtuse ; and experiencing each is frequently painful although I made it through Posthumanism , I couldn't finish Dancer.

Katherine Hayles whom Wolfe seems generally to dislike! View all 4 comments. Aug 30, anon rated it really liked it. May 19, Stephen rated it it was amazing Shelves: 21st-century , united-states. The introduction and the first chapter are a nearly impenetrable doozy, but the following chapters are more lucid, stirring, and quite important. I'm glad I stuck with it. The chapter that utilizes Temple Grandin's memoirs to connect disability studies, animal studies, and posthumanist paradigms is especially fascinating and inspiring.

Aug 06, Jessica Maginity rated it liked it. Feb 11, Mjhancock rated it liked it Shelves: scholarly , digital-media , bio-tech. In just under pages, Wolfe argues for a new articulation of what posthumanism can and should mean. I may attempt a longer review of this book later, but for now, I'll just spread all of my immediate responses out on the table, and you can decide what picture resulting collage forms.

Wolfe's argument begins with a basic disgruntlement with current versions of posthumanism, especially that of N. Katherine Hayles. He thinks that these arguments fail in that they attempt to create a posthuman wa In just under pages, Wolfe argues for a new articulation of what posthumanism can and should mean.

He thinks that these arguments fail in that they attempt to create a posthuman way of thinking, but can't escape humanism because they just recreate the subject position from a different perspective. The book, roughly, is about applying this new posthumanism to various other theories and artifacts. The first half is a focus on theory, and it's rather slow going. Wolfe's first act with the new posthumanism is to explain system theory by how it fits with deconstructionism, and if you don't have a firm grasp on your Derrida, then you're likely to find yourself at sea like me.

Later chapters in this section, such as the one on posthumanism and disability theory and the one on posthumanism and animal theory, work better, but still assume a fairly high level of familiarity with the respective latter element of focus.

The second half focuses on artifacts and examples that already employ the posthumanism that Wolfe is arguing for, and it's a lot more accessible or at least easier to read. And Wolfe has assembled a truly diverse set of artifacts, from bio-engineered art projects to the musical Dancer in the Dark to Waldo Emerson--and that's not even counting the building that was manufactured with its own cloud.

The second section adds clarity to the earlier arguments, to the point where a second reading is very much prompted, if not necessitated. Unfortunately, it's not just a matter of familiarity with arguments that held me back. In a discipline known for its obfuscating sentence construction, Wolfe justifies his own membership with some sentences that are so convoluted that they can only be said in a single breath by professional divers.

Ultimately, the book seems almost more a rehabilitation of systems theory than a book on posthumanism per se, but it would be essential reading for anyone commenting on the topics it touches on extensively deconstructionism, posthumanism, animal theory, disabilities theory. May 11, The Awdude rated it really liked it. Derrida plus Luhmann equals be nice to animals or shame on you.

Some good ideas in here. Finally systems theory seems to be catching on, which is a good thing. But I'm still worried about this trend of de-centering the subject that seems to be never-ending. I mean, of course the subject isn't real, but if you take away agency then how do you hold anyone responsible for anything? Anyway, I dug it overall. Definitely got the ole wheels a-turnin'. Aug 10, Alice rated it liked it.

Pinar Tasdemir rated it really liked it May 19, Miranda rated it liked it Nov 19, Yinan Luo rated it really liked it Dec 14, Janet rated it it was ok Nov 22, Matt rated it it was amazing Dec 02, Casey Goodson rated it liked it Jul 11, Abigail Robertson rated it it was amazing Jan 11, Luke rated it really liked it Jul 20, Felicia rated it really liked it Feb 07, Luiza Kazi rated it liked it Nov 28, Annie rated it really liked it Aug 08, Bridget Moynihan rated it really liked it Jun 22,

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Coming soon. Can a new kind of humanities—posthumanities—respond to the redefinition of humanity's place in the world by both the technological and the biological or "green" continuum in which the "human" is but one life form among many? Exploring this radical repositioning, Cary Wolfe ranges across bioethics, cognitive science, animal ethics, gender, and disability to develop a theoretical and philosophical approach responsive to our changing understanding of ourselves and our world. What Is Posthumanism? What does it mean to think beyond humanism? Is it possible to craft a mode of philosophy, ethics, and interpretation that rejects the classic humanist divisions of self and other, mind and body, society and nature, human and animal, organic and technological? Exploring how both critical thought along with cultural practice have reacted to this radical repositioning, Cary Wolfe—one of the founding figures in the field of animal studies and posthumanist theory—ranges across bioethics, cognitive science, animal ethics, gender, and disability to develop a theoretical and philosophical approach responsive to our changing understanding of ourselves and our world.

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What Is Posthumanism?

What does it mean to think beyond humanism? Is it possible to craft a mode of philosophy, ethics, and interpretation that rejects the classic humanist divisions of self and other, mind and body, society and nature, human and animal, organic and technological? Can a new kind of humanities-posthumanities-respond to the redefinition of humanity's place in the world by both the technological and the biological or "green" continuum in which the "human" is but one life form among many? Exploring how both critical thought along with cultural practice have reacted to this radical repositioning, Cary Wolfe-one of the founding figures in the field of animal studies and posthumanist theory-ranges across bioethics, cognitive science, animal ethics, gender, and disability to develop a theoretical and philosophical approach responsive to our changing understanding of ourselves and our world.

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This is the tenth in a series of dialogues with philosophers and critical theorists on the question of violence. This conversation is with Cary Wolfe, who is the director of the Center for Critical and Cultural Theory at Rice University and the founding editor of the Posthumanities book series at the University of Minnesota Press. There is, in fact, a genealogy of posthumanist thought that stretches back well before the 21st or even 20th century. Darwinian thought was a huge step in this direction.

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