KONWENCJA STCW PDF

Journal Vol. Information for Authors. Publication Ethics and Publication Malpractice Statement. List of Reviewers in TransNav Journal. Previous paper - Contents - Next paper.

Author:Daigami Akilrajas
Country:Monaco
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Environment
Published (Last):26 June 2015
Pages:293
PDF File Size:6.28 Mb
ePub File Size:6.21 Mb
ISBN:703-1-19180-374-1
Downloads:29306
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Samukasa



You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page.

Turn on more accessible mode. Turn off more accessible mode. Skip Ribbon Commands. Skip to main content. Turn off Animations. Turn on Animations. It looks like your browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Please turn on JavaScript and try again.

List of Conventions. Status of Conventions. Affiliated Bodies and Programmes. The STCW Convention was the first to establish basic requirements on training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers on an international level. Previously the standards of training, certification and watchkeeping of officers and ratings were established by individual governments, usually without reference to practices in other countries.

As a result standards and procedures varied widely, even though shipping is the most international of all industries. The Convention prescribes minimum standards relating to training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers which countries are obliged to meet or exceed. The amendments , adopted by a Conference, represented a major revision of the Convention, in response to a recognized need to bring the Convention up to date and to respond to critics who pointed out the many vague phrases, such as "to the satisfaction of the Administration", which resulted in different interpretations being made.

The amendments entered into force on 1 February One of the major features of the revision was the division of the technical annex into regulations, divided into Chapters as before, and a new STCW Code, to which many technical regulations were transferred. Part A of the Code is mandatory while Part B is recommended. Dividing the regulations up in this way makes administration easier and it also makes the task of revising and updating them more simple: for procedural and legal reasons there is no need to call a full conference to make changes to Codes.

This represented the first time that IMO had been called upon to act in relation to compliance and implementation - generally, implementation is down to the flag States, while port State control also acts to ensure compliance.

Generally speaking, the Convention contains basic requirements which are then enlarged upon and explained in the Code. Part A of the Code is mandatory. The minimum standards of competence required for seagoing personnel are given in detail in a series of tables.

Part B of the Code contains recommended guidance which is intended to help Parties implement the Convention. The measures suggested are not mandatory and the examples given are only intended to illustrate how certain Convention requirements may be complied with. However, the recommendations in general represent an approach that has been harmonized by discussions within IMO and consultation with other international organizations.

Amongst the amendments adopted, there are a number of important changes to each chapter of the Convention and Code, including:. The working languages are English, French and Spanish. Some content on this site is available in all official languages. The majority is presented in the working languages.

BRIAN OREND HUMAN RIGHTS CONCEPT AND CONTEXT PDF

Advantages of Preservation of Obligatory Voice Communication on the VHF Radio Channel 16

You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Turn on more accessible mode. Turn off more accessible mode. Skip Ribbon Commands. Skip to main content.

DAVID GALULA PDF

Toggle navigation. The Convention was significantly amended in The STCW Convention was the first to establish basic requirements on training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers on an international level. Previously the standards of training, certification and watchkeeping of officers and ratings were established by individual governments, usually without reference to practices in other countries. As a result, standards and procedures varied widely, even though shipping is extremely international by nature.

Related Articles