LOST IN THE FUNHOUSE BY JOHN BARTH PDF

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The main protagonist is 13 year old Ambrose who gets lost in the funhouse — any discerning reader would not have to work hard to see how a story of a pubescent teenage boy in the company of an uninterested teenage girl could find himself, both literally and metaphorically, lost in the funhouse. However, considered alongside the theories I have discussed on this website, another layer of interpretative reading materialises that, I believe, secures Barths postmodern presence within a much wider contextual standing.

But he has. Then he wishes he were dead. In a metaphorical mirror-room, the reader is presented with the same old familiar vision, an arbitrary intermediary that the author and reader fruitlessly partake in.

His first-person narrative voice disregards the already-established third person omniscient narrator and thus, unnerves the readers preconceived notions of how a story should told within a text. Very early on in the story, the narration is interrupted, the author shattering what appears to be realism in order to convey to the reader the process of writing and the literary and linguistic conventions that are associated with such a text.

It is as if the author felt it necessary to delete the names for reasons of tact or legal liability. Through his relatively short text, Barth conveys a much broader contextual audit of postmodernism — he gives the reader an opportunity to explore metanarratives, metafiction, the authors function, emerging forms of fiction and the art of writing fiction. There are many other features of Barths fiction that I could have analysed but for me, I wanted to explore Barths attitude to postmodernism and the ways that he sought to demonstrate his ideas.

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EXTREME PRODUCTIVITY POZEN PDF

Lost in the Funhouse by John Barth, 1968

The main protagonist is 13 year old Ambrose who gets lost in the funhouse — any discerning reader would not have to work hard to see how a story of a pubescent teenage boy in the company of an uninterested teenage girl could find himself, both literally and metaphorically, lost in the funhouse. However, considered alongside the theories I have discussed on this website, another layer of interpretative reading materialises that, I believe, secures Barths postmodern presence within a much wider contextual standing. But he has. Then he wishes he were dead. In a metaphorical mirror-room, the reader is presented with the same old familiar vision, an arbitrary intermediary that the author and reader fruitlessly partake in. His first-person narrative voice disregards the already-established third person omniscient narrator and thus, unnerves the readers preconceived notions of how a story should told within a text. Very early on in the story, the narration is interrupted, the author shattering what appears to be realism in order to convey to the reader the process of writing and the literary and linguistic conventions that are associated with such a text.

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Lost in the Funhouse

John Barth is no doubt best known as a novelist, but his one collection of short stories, Lost in the Funhouse: Fiction for Print, Tape, Live Voice , is so startling in its virtuosity that Barth's place in the history of short fiction is also assured. In "Lost in the Funhouse" Ambrose travels to an amusement park on the Maryland shore with his parents, brother Peter, and Peter's girlfriend Magda. As the title suggests, Ambrose gets lost in the fun house. More important, by the end he realizes the direction he will henceforth take in reference to art—he will be a writer—and life, specifically in terms of sex and love. The tragic implications are felt through the realization that the choice between art and life of necessity excludes thereafter the one not chosen. Ambrose chooses art, but he does so reluctantly. The story is an example of metafiction, as are most others in the collection, for it is not only about Ambrose's trip to the park but also about writing a story about Ambrose's trip to the park.

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