ANDREAS CAPELLANUS ART COURTLY LOVE PDF

Love is an inborn suffering proceeding from the sight and immoderate thought upon the beauty of the other sex, for which cause above all other things one wishes to embrace the other and, by common assent, in this embrace to fulfill the commandments of love. From Whence Love is Named "Love amor " is derived from the word "hook amar ", which signifies "capture" or "be captured. Just as a shrewd fisherman tries to attract fish with his bait and to catch them on with his curved hook, so he who is truly captured by love tries to attract another with his blandishments and with all his power tries to hold two hearts together with one spiritual chain or, if they be already united, to hold them always together. What is the Effect of Love This is the effect of love: that the true lover can not be corrupted by avarice; love makes an ugly and rude person shine with all beauty, knows how to endow with nobility even one of humble birth, can even lend humility to the proud; he who loves is accustomed humbly to serve others. Oh, what a marvelous thing is love, which makes a man shine with so many virtues and which teaches everyone to abound in good customs.

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Love is an inborn suffering proceeding from the sight and immoderate thought upon the beauty of the other sex, for which cause above all other things one wishes to embrace the other and, by common assent, in this embrace to fulfill the commandments of love. From Whence Love is Named "Love amor " is derived from the word "hook amar ", which signifies "capture" or "be captured. Just as a shrewd fisherman tries to attract fish with his bait and to catch them on with his curved hook, so he who is truly captured by love tries to attract another with his blandishments and with all his power tries to hold two hearts together with one spiritual chain or, if they be already united, to hold them always together.

What is the Effect of Love This is the effect of love: that the true lover can not be corrupted by avarice; love makes an ugly and rude person shine with all beauty, knows how to endow with nobility even one of humble birth, can even lend humility to the proud; he who loves is accustomed humbly to serve others.

Oh, what a marvelous thing is love, which makes a man shine with so many virtues and which teaches everyone to abound in good customs. What Persons are Suited for Love [The author goes on to specify the requirements of a lover -- girls must be at least 12, boys 14, though for true love men must be at least 18 years old and under 60 after that age, though copulation is possible true passion is lacking ; women must be under fifty.

Age, blindness and excessive passion are all bars to true love. Therefore love cannot arise in him, as is adequately proven above. But I recognize that this is true only of the moment in which love is acquired, for I do not deny that love can endure in a man who acquired love before he went blind.

Too great an abundance of passion impedes love, for there are those who are so enslaved by desire that they cannot be restrained by the bonds of love; those who after deep thoughts of their lady or even having enjoyed the fruits of love, when they see another immediately desire her embraces, forgetting the services received from their former lover and revealing their ingratitude. Yet you extol me as more beautiful than other women. The man says: The custom of the wise is never to praise their own beauty.

And if you think yourself not beautiful, then you should consider me a true lover, since your beauty seems to me to be greater than that of all other women; love makes even an ugly woman seem beautiful to her lover. The woman says : Although, your virtue is greatly to be praised, I am young and I shudder at the thought of the embraces of old men. The man says : Certainly old age is not to be blamed. Third Dialogue A plebian gentleman speaks with a woman of the higher nobility.

The man says : If a man of the middle class seeks to join himself in love with a women of the higher nobility, he ought to have a multitude of good qualities, for in order for a lower-born man to be worthy to seek the love of a higher born woman, he should be filled with inumerable good qualities, and an infinite number of good deeds should extol him.

Thus if, after a long period of proof, he is found worthy of love, a woman of the higher nobility may choose a plebian gentlemen as her lover. The lady says that she is not pleased that he ranks so far beneath her. But your words show clearly that you refuse to love me and that this is because of the lowness of my inferior rank, even though I have great virtue. The aforementioned distinction of classes does not prohibit me from being numbered among the superior classes or to ask the rewards of a higher class, provided that can justly object to me on the grounds of my character.

The woman says : Although virtue can ennoble a plebian, yet you cannot change your rank to the extent that a plebian is made a great lord or vavasor, unless he is granted that by the power of the prince, who as he pleases may add nobility to good morals.

By right then you are denied advancement to the love of a countess. Moreover, you claim to be numbered among the knights, yet I discern in you much that is contrary and harmful to that state. For knights by their nature should have thin and graceful calves and a foot of moderate size, longer than it is wide, as if it had been formed with a certain touch of art.

I see that your thighs on the contrary are fat and round and your feet are huge and as wide as they are long. The man says : If for his manners and integrity a commoner is worthy of being ennobled by a prince, I do not see why he should not be worthy of a noble woman's love.

For if moral integrity alone makes a man worthy of being noble and only nobility is considered worthy of the love of a noblewoman, then it follows that only moral integrity is worthy to be crowned with the love of a noble lady.

But that objection which you put to me about my flabby legs and big feet is not very reasonable. It is said that in the frontier regions of Italy, there lives a certain count who has finely shaped legs, descended from a line of counts, illustrious ancestors, who in the sacred palace of the Holy See rejoices in elevated offices and shines with every sort of beauty and abounds in riches; yet it is said that he is devoid of virtue; all good customs fear him and every depravity finds its dwelling place in him.

On the contrary, there is a king in Hungary who has very fat legs and big feet, and is almost entirely destitute of beauty. And yet he has such shining virtue he is worthy to recieve the glory of the royal crown and almost the whole world resounds with his praises. And so you should not ask about my legs and my feet, but what virtues I have acquired by my own deeds.

You should learn to object not to one's legs but to one's morals, since in objecting to legs you seem to be objecting to divine nature.

LEONARDO ZEEVAERT PDF

The Art of Courtly Love

Andreas Capellanus was the twelfth century author of a treatise commonly titled De amore "About Love" , also known as De arte honeste amandi , for which a possible English translation is The Art of Courtly Love. His real identity has never been determined, but has been a matter of extended academic debate. De Amore was written sometime between and It was most likely intended for the French court of Philip Augustus. John Jay Parry, who edited De Amore , has described it as "one of those capital works which reflect the thought of a great epoch, which explains the secret of a civilization. It is often associated with Eleanor of Aquitaine herself the granddaughter of an early troubadour poet, William IX of Aquitaine , but this link has never been verified. It has been proposed that De Amore codifies the social and sexual life of Eleanor's court at Poitiers between and because the author mentions both Eleanor and her daughter Marie by name; but there is no evidence that Marie ever saw her mother again after Eleanor's divorce from Louis VII in

AVE VERUM COLIN MAWBY PDF

After becoming popularized by the troubadours of southern France in the twelfth century, the social system of 'courtly love' soon spread. Evidence of the influence of courtly love in the culture and literature of most of western Europe spans centuries. This unabridged edition of codifies life at Queen Eleanor's court at Poitiers between and into 'one of those capital works which reflect the thought of a great epoch, which explain the secret of a civilization. The Art of Courtly Love or The Treatise of Love was written between 86 and takes the form of an instructional manual to a young courtier. According to C S Lewis courtly love was based on four

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